The Life Skills Acquired While Preparing For The General Paper

The Singapore education system has a subject called the General Paper (GP) at the ‘A levels’. A compulsory subject for almost all students, GP consists of two separate papers. The first paper, titled Paper 1, consists of twelve questions with topics from all possible fields. History, mathematics and philosophy are examples of the vast range of the melange of fields from which topics are selected for Paper 1. In a time limit of ninety minutes, candidates should select any one question from the twelve and write an essay with a word count between 500 and 800 words. The share of the final grade contributed by Paper 1 is 50%.

The second paper, titled Paper 2, tests the ability of the candidate to not only understand the content of two passages of continuous prose but also analyse and summarise the entire essay. All these tasks have to be completed within a time period of 90 minutes. The criteria for testing include the command over the vocabulary and grammar of the language as well the ability to grasp the underlying message of the content.

Many students and parents underestimate the magnitude of the difficulties faced by students while attempting to surmount the GP paper. Writing a 500 to 800 word essay in 90 minutes is quite a challenging task. Preparing for Paper 2 also can an onerous endeavour. Owing to these hurdles, it is wise to enrol in GP tuition classes  to gain a better ability to tackle the General Paper.

While working hard to perform exceptionally in the GP, it is crucial to understand the important life skills learned while preparing for and writing this paper. Owing to the diversity of fields from which topics are selected, preparing for GP requires a remarkable general knowledge. GP students should have significant knowledge about current affairs and historical events.

The main purpose of the GP is to develop critical thinking abilities in students. A skill that will be tremendously useful in any career, critical thinking involves solving problems using reason and facts. A critical thinker will look at any situation from many different angles. The second benefit of the GP is a vast improvement in the ability to use language to communicate one’s thoughts and express ideas imaginatively. Finally, students who are successful in GP acquire a mastery over the grammar and the vocabulary of the English language. Owing to the usefulness of the English language in international communication, proficiency in this language is worth its weight in gold.

Analyzing The Effectiveness Of Tuition Centres In Singapore

 

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) conducts the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in member nations and a significant number of non-member nations. The purpose of this test is to evaluate the performance of 15-year-old school students in mathematics, science, and reading. The scores are intended to set a benchmark for countries seeking to improve their education systems. Since 2000, this assessment has been conducted every three years.

The results PISA for 2015 were released in December 2016. Singapore topped the ranking in all three subjects. The city state has been performing exceptionally since the first PISA in 2000. Its ranking has always been among the top ten countries. How do school students in Singapore score so high in PISA? The school system in Singapore is a highly competitive environment where students put in a tremendous amount of effort to perform well in their exams. The teachers are also highly trained and the government closely supervises the curriculum to keep it as updated with the latest global developments.

Despite having one of the most highly rated education systems in the world, statistics revealed that tuition centres which were worth $650 million in 2004 are a one billion dollar industry today. The paradox of Singapore’s world class education system is that parents are spending a significant amount of their earnings to send their children to tuition centres. Why is this happening and how effective are these tuition centres in improving the academic performance of the students?

One possible reason for the proliferation of tuition centres could be the highly competitive, result oriented nature of the Singaporean education system. Students take the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE) after completing six years of primary education. Entry into secondary school is decided based on the marks obtained in the PLSE examination. After completing four years of secondary school education, students take the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Ordinary Level (O-level) to start their post-secondary education. After completing two years of post-secondary education, students take the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level (A-level) to enter university. Owing to the fact that these exams are held nationally and success in these exams is highly valued in Singaporean society, parents turn to tuition centres to help their children gain a competitive edge over the rest of the students. From tuition for Singapore’s unique Integrated Programme (ip) to general paper (gp) tuition, Singapore has numerous tuition centres to help students with their academics.

Despite the popularity of tuition centres, experts say that they are useful only in improving the knowledge of basic concepts. They are sceptical about the ability of tuition centres to improve critical thinking and problem solving skills.

5 ways to ace JC economics

Economics being a vast subject requires a lot of attention, understanding and love for the subject. It is also a complex subject, spilling over to many other subjects like finance, sociology, environmental science, etc.

If you do want to do well, but are not able to because you can’t understand many topics, the complexity bogs you down, you can’t manage your time well or simply you dread the subject, there are ways to enhance your performance.

5 ways to ace JC economics

  1. Overcome your fear

The biggest reason of underperformance is our fear of the subject. Don’t approach the subject with the most difficult topics. Start with the relatively easier/interesting ones and once you start to get a hang of it, slowly approach the difficult topics. The moment you start grasping the concepts of the easier ones it’ll give you the confidence to tackle the difficult topics. However, despite this if you are still stuck on difficult topics, the best thing to do would be to enrol in a good JC economics tuition centre.

  1. Create a timetable

The moment you are able to organise your schoolwork, you’ll automatically start feeling lighter and the dread towards economics will diminish. Create a general schedule and a daily schedule where revision time and assignment time are included. If you have a general revision time every day, rather than right before tests and exams, tests and assignments won’t seem that difficult. Creating a timetable also allows you enough time for your social life so you don’t grudge your studies

  1. Take short breaks every hour

When you sit down to study make sure you have at least a 10 minute break every hour. Grab a bite, listen to music, do anything that helps to relax you and rejuvenate you. However, don’t extend the break as then you’ll get too distracted and will find it difficult to concentrate

  1. Keep your phone switched off

Phone, IM on the laptop, should all be turned off. Phones are the easiest distracters and when you’re anyway tackling a difficult subject like economics, the more distracted you get the more difficult it will be to concentrate and understand concepts. It’ll take you a long time to grasp the topic, which will frustrate you.

  1. Enrol in a tuition centre

If you’re not able to manage time despite creating a schedule, or still can’t grasp concepts, you should enrol in a good JC economics tuition centre. You will be able to see the drastic difference in your performance in class. However, all the four points should still be followed even if you enrol.

Performance pressure is one of the most common reasons for underperformance. If that is tackled, you will surely be able to ace JC economics.

The Relevance of an IB Education

 

To ace the International Baccalaureate (IB) you need to be well read and knowledgeable with an analytical bent of mind. The versatility of economics as a subject has a bearing where one can flip careers from the financial services industry to government, consulting and even human resource development! As a science, though one would categorize it as an arts subject, it helps one benefit in the domain of trade relations, property market and its regulations, social, political and finally economic issues.

 

The JC economics tuition center paves the way for students to get a distinct score for A- level economics. To take advantage of the coaching will complement your score to achieve the IB level of educative ratings. The K12 education system in the field of economics helps one get by in life with theoretical analyses. The subject does have a tendency to get mundane, but once you actually digest the content of the subject matter, the graphology and equations will never be rote, ever.

 

The fundamental concepts of a subject, which cannot be taught through mystery is what you call economics. The IB level of learning is extremely holistic in nature. The size of the coursework, however, can rigorous and throw anyone off his game. Nevertheless, to get on and achieve the highest score, practical tests always work. Rote learning or mugging material to qualify for the pre-tertiary examinations never benefits anyone who is expecting to achieve her or his international baccalaureate.

 

The JC economics tuition helps students understand the subject as they find the right perspectives. A variety of essays and case studies are throw open to students to help them reach approximates in levels of data. During the course of the program, every student is guided by experts who have scored distinctions in the NIE practicum. The professional tutors ensure that everyone learns how to be comprehensive with his response after understanding the subject in detail. Economics is vast and evolves over time. However, the rudiments remain dynamically static.

 

The website http://www.indigo.com.sg/ provides in-depth information about the course content and the value the educators bring to the fore. Achieving an IB degree takes considerable patience, effort, intelligence, aptitude and keen analysis. Without any of these basics, one cannot get past the initial stages. Ergo, while the value of economics remains a knowledgeable subject, the analytical bent of mind has to take over. An IB degree is extremely relevant today as it paves the way for youngsters to achieve success.

An Assessment Of The Benefits And Flaws Of Singapore’s Integrated Programme

The Integrated Programme (IP), an unconventional and radical approach to post-primary education, was first proposed by Singapore’s Ministry of Education (MOE) in 2004. The keystone of this programme is to provide opportunities to the top ranking students to develop their intellectual capabilities to the maximum possible extent.

Singapore’s system of compulsory education consists of six years of primary school following which students take the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE) to enter secondary school. After four years of secondary school, which is also compulsory, students take the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Ordinary Level (O-level). Students attend two years of post-secondary education following which they take the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level (A-level) to get into a university. In an Integrated Programme, a student will attend six years of post-primary education and attempt the A-levels to enter university. The O levels are skipped in this educational approach.

Owing to the absence of the O-levels, students who enrol in the Integrated Programme have much more time available, which they can use to learn a variety of useful skills. Only those students who rank in the top 10% of the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE) are allowed to choose this programme. Given the brilliance of this approach to education, it is crucial to evaluate the benefits as well as the pitfalls in this programme.

The positive aspects of this educational strategy are obvious. A substantial amount of time is spent by secondary students in Singapore preparing for their O-levels. Integrated Programme students have close to 20% more time available as they skip the O-levels. During this extra period of time, academically gifted students can learn not only a variety of useful life skills but also a significant number of innovative methods optimising their talents. After seeing the benefits of the Integrated Programme, the possible flaws should be identified and strategies should be devised to prevent the potential damage caused by these flaws.

The most important risk in the Integrated Programme is that the student misses out on the structure of the O levels that builds a strong academic foundation. As Integrated Programme students take their A-levels without taking their O-levels, a significant amount of self-discipline is required to develop a strong academic foundation. It is crucial for parents to take a decision whether their child has a learning style that is suited to the Integrated Programme. For students struggling to cope with the Integrated Programme, it is necessary to consider extra tuition as an option. There are a variety of tuition centres offering IP English tuition, IP maths tuition and IP science tuition

Why is proficiency in English important

There are four mains reasons why it is important for your child to be proficient in the English language. Thus it is very important that they start English tuitions for primary school level so that they can get a boost in their future.

1.Although English is only the third most common language that is spoken in the world it is spoken in almost all countries of the world and the number of people who speak this language can amount to around 2 billion people.

2.English is the most dominant language that is used throughout the business world and has become a necessity for a person who is in a global workforce to know this language and to be able to communicate well using it. English has been able to help businesses cross borders and it is very important to know this language as it may have the ability to change a child’s life and open them up to opportunities that would not be available without a proficient knowledge of English. Now-a-days most of the companies of the world conduct English proficiency tests that are made part of the recruitment process. Being able to communicate well and put forth their thought in clear words will give children an advantage when they are applying for jobs.

3.Most of the world top media such as books, films and music is all published in English. A good knowledge of English can bring forward a completely new world of entertainment that wasn’t previously available to the child. In a rare case your child can start to enjoy this media so much that they may want to be a part of it and a solid basis of English can also give them the opportunity to join this world of glitz and glamour which would greatly improve their standard of living and help them earn a lot of money.

4.Finally most of the content that is available on the internet is in English. Making sure that your child understands English and is able to read and write English can open them up to a wealth of information that can be found on the internet and this helps them learn more not only during the school years but also throughout their life. This can give them an added advantage over their peers at any point of their career as they can keep themselves up to date with all the news about the field that they choose.

Why Is It Important For Kids To Learn Economics?

Economics is an integral part of our daily lives as all are monetary decisions are based on it. Research has shown that children have the ability to grasp economic principles easily at a young age. In fact, the impact of it is such that children start applying those principles to their everyday life. Therefore, it is an added advantage if children learn economics at a young age. The following are a few interesting ways in which you can teach your child the various concepts of economics.

Learning activities

One of the easiest ways to make your child learn various concepts is through learning activities. It can be through fun activities like board games like Life or Monopoly. It can also be an activity book that challenges your child’s mind. To make it more interesting, you can turn these board games into a competition where your child will be rewarded if he or she wins the game. As a result, your child will be able to understand the fundamentals of economics.

Tasks involving money

Small tasks like buying something from the grocery store can teach your child to be conscious about spending money. Taking your child to the Wal-Mart and asking them to figure out products that offer a free gift or come at discounted prices is a great learning lesson. In doing this, your child becomes aware of the supply and demand concept based on the quality of the product, the comparison of rates from last week or month and the discounted prices. By giving these small tasks, you are equipping your child to make financial decisions in future.

Giving weekly allowances

Allowances or pocket money is a great way to encourage your child to save money. Keep monthly goals for saving money, for buying a favourite toy and for donating to charity. Your child will be able to keep tabs on his or her spending along with becoming judicious about money.

Having conversations about economy

It may sound boring, but having a conversation about the changing economy with your child will enable them to clear their misunderstandings about the economy. Research has shown that children believe that going to a shop every day is an outing rather than a financial transaction for a product or that the price of a product only depends on the colour and size rather than the cost of material, brand value, etc. You can also enrol your child into a JC economics tuition centre to learn economic concepts.

Your Vote Counts in the 2006 Weblog Awards

Finalists for the 2006 Weblog Awards were announced today. Hundreds of blogs in dozens of categories are nominated, and the winners will be determined by online voting. Voting begins tomorrow and continues for 10 days, and you are welcome to vote in each category once each day.

Terra Extraneus encourages our readers to support three of our favorite blogs in the voting beginning tomorrow. They are:

Evangelical Outpost, written by Joe Carter, nominated for Best Individual Blog. Last year E.O. was voted Best Religious Blog, but that category was eliminated this year. But Joe is still up for an award with his nomination for best individual blog. Joe, the Director of Web Communications for the evangelical conservative Family Research Council, blogs an interesting mix of conservative politics, evangelical faith and random trivia. E.O. is on TerraX’s “Must Read” blogroll. Check it out, and give it your vote starting tomorrow.

Jon Swift, nominated for Best Humor Blog. If you are a regular TerraX reader, you know that I am a big Jon Swift fan. He is hilarious. Jon is a liberal in satirical sheep’s clothing. I read everything “Jon” writes and encourage you to do the same. (Here’s my review of Jon Swift: “What If Archie Bunker Were a Blogger?”) What truly amazes is that “Jon Swift” began his blog only one year ago, and he is already approaching his 200,000th visitor. Please join me in bringing the Jon Swift blog even more much-deserved attention by voting it the Best Humor Blog in the blogosphere.

Real Climate, written by an international team of PhDs, is nominated for Best Science Blog. Real Climate covers global warming and other climate issues. The scientists do an excellent job of making the science of this complicated subject understandable. Anyone who wants to be up-to-speed on global warming should read Real Climate. This is one blog that truly is making a difference, so I hope you will give it your online vote.

• I want to mention one more blog: Sean Gleeson, nominated for best in the 5001-6750 level of the “blogging ecosystem.” I am not a regular Sean Gleeson reader, but I’m going to change that by adding him to the TerraX blogroll. Gleeson is an Oklahoma City artist and teacher. We Okie bloggers and blog readers should stick together, so I’m going to start reading Sean’s blog, and will give him my vote in the Awards.

Hope you will do the same.

The Nostradamus of the Blogosphere

Jon Swift, one of the most astute conservative pundits on the Internet, is also a prophet. Astonishingly, three of his eight predictions for 2006 came true, qualifying him as the Nostradamus of the blogosphere. Swift has posted 25 predictions for 2007. Here are four of my favorites:

Time magazine will select itself as Person of the Year.

• John Kerry repeatedly uses the n-word in a joke gone horribly wrong.

• In the season finale of Lost we discover that it was all a dream by Hurley who wakes up in Bob Newhart’s hotel.

• Whatever happens in 2007, you can be sure it would have been a lot worse and more people would have died if we had done something else.

The prophecies above are indeed thought-provoking. But what truly amazes is that Swift is so prescient that five of his prophecies for 2007 have already come true – even before the new year begins. Swift prophesied that:

• Pictures of Rudolph Giuliani in drag will surface, scuttling his plans to run for President.

• Congress will do nothing at all about Social Security or health care.

• The next six months in Iraq will prove to be critical for determining how the following six months are going to go.

• Temperatures will go down in February causing widespread doubt about global warming, but by July there will be renewed calls to do something about it.

• Recruitment shortfalls lead the Pentagon to hire temps to fill some positions and outsource some work to the Indian military.

One can only tremble in wonderment regarding a prophet so keen that his prophecies have come true even before he makes them. Check out the rest of Jon Swift’s vision for 2007 here.

New Economic Study: Neither Conservatives Nor Liberals Understand Public’s Economic Fears

[Average Americans] understand the economy differently – and view it much more negatively – than Bush Administration officials, Wall Street analysts and conservative economists who stress positive macro-economic statistics. Indeed, nothing raises the public ire more than the elites saying this is a good economy, which seems to deny the hard work and inventiveness of people who raise their living standards against the odds. However, conservatives are not alone in this disconnect with the public on the economy, as liberal elites portrayal of Americans as passive victims also alienates their intended audience. These liberal elites underestimate Americans’ emphasis on personal responsibility and greatly overestimate the degree to which they see themselves as victims in the current economy.

The above is an excerpt from one of two studies recently made available online by the Economic Policy Institute:

  • “The Economic Disconnect: How Both the Left and the Right Get It Wrong,” Dec. 5, 2006, 11 pages.
  • “Talking Past Each Other: What Everyday Americans Really Think (and Elites Don’t Get) About the Economy,” December 2006, 64 pages.

Some excerpts from Economic Disconnect:

  • The opening excerpt above.
  • “Americans are dissatisfied with the national economy, and are doubtful it will improve in the future. This is an economy defined by its inability to produce rising incomes in the face of growing financial pressures, though people are proud of their efforts to overcome these systemic obstacles.”
  • “Over two thirds of the country view the economy negatively. … The public’s central perspective is of a middle class in decline, badly squeezed between rising costs, reduced benefits, and stagnant earnings. The public holds out little hope for the economy improving any time soon, suggesting that these current problems may reflect a structural change.”
  • “Americans see themselves as largely on their own in the current economy, but they are eager for the government to take on a more active role to help ease their financial burden in areas such as health care, energy and education and support greater regulation of the corporate interests that are seen as contributing to these rising costs.”

Here is a press release which summarizes Talking Past.

Also, here is a link to a recent post I wrote regarding middle-class economics: “Who’s in the Middle Class, How Much Do They Make — and How Much is Left Over?”